LGBTQ teens in abusive relationships: a personal account

Slider Image 1

This article is personal, but still based in fact. When one of the qnotes editorial team informed me that we’d missed Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month in February, I was ashamed. I, of all people, should have addressed this issue that affects so many young people, LGBTQ and otherwise. After all, it affected me not so long ago.

“Thirty-three percent of adolescents in America are victim to sexual, physical, verbal, or emotional dating abuse,” reads DoSomething.org, an activism organization for young people. “Only one-third of the teens who were involved in an abusive relationship confided in someone about the violence.”

These statistics gave me a visceral reaction. Instantly, the nauseous anxiety of my teens returned full-force.

I told no one about the abuse I suffered when a teenager in my first romantic relationship.

Now, I can’t be silent anymore.

(Excerpt from Maria Dominguez’s post in Qnotes- read more)

Blind Glastonbury teen stuns and inspires with her powerful voice

butterfly

GLASTONBURY — At just 13-years-old, Paige Dury has never met a challenge she couldn’t handle. She may not be able to see, but in sharing her story she’s hoping others never lose sight of their goals, and never give up hope for the future.

Paige, of Glastonbury, Connecticut can’t see the smiles on people faces when they hear her incredible voice, but she knows they’re there. The cheers and claps of the crowd of thousands at a recent Hartford Wolf Pack game tells it all.

“Singing makes me feel happy, and I love making people feel something when I sing, and then the reaction that people give me at the end makes it worth it too like it makes me want to do it more because people are enjoying it,” she said.

(Excerpt from Erika Arias’s post for Fox 61 News- read more)

Are you autistic? Getting diagnosed as a teen or adult

water drop

About 1.5 million people in the United States have autism, according to Advancing Futures for Adults with Autism. This number has increased significantly in the past couple of decades, likely due to greater knowledge about the disorder.

Even with that greater knowledge, the number is only an estimate and it becomes murkier when discussing people other than kids.

The number of adults living with autism today is even less certain according to AFFA. “Some sources cite that roughly 80 percent of those individuals with autism are under the age of 22.”

(Excerpt from Sinclair Cares article in Sinclair Broadcasting-read more)