Teen works through his rare disease

Teen works through his rare disease

FRUITLAND — At a time when he should be going to school and being active, Bryce Fisher, of Fruitland, can do neither. This is because he has a very rare disease that is making it hard to get around. It keeps him inside his home, away from other people.

Bryce, now 13, has been dealing with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomylitis, a rare disease in which the immune system attacks healthy bones, said his mother Carolyn Anderson. The disease can cause a number of problems with the skeletal system, including inflammation, bone deformity, broken bones and intense pain. The disease strikes one in 300 people world-wide, she said.

(Excerpt from Larry Meyer’s article in the Argus Observer- Read more) 

 

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Unhealthy teen relationships may still need room to grow

Janus Bazan is the guidance counsellor department head at Kelvin High School.

 

Emily Bernardin may only be 19 years old, but she knows a thing or two about love, and what it’s like to be in an unhealthy relationship.

“I had some bad experiences, but I’ve grown from them,” said Bernardin, who credits her mother for giving her room to grow.

“My mom knew [about the bad relationship]. We talked about it a lot and she knew she couldn’t make me do anything. She was just there for me through the whole thing, and watched as it fell apart,” said Bernardin.

Guidance counsellors at Kelvin High School watch things fall apart and get put back together on a daily basis. For counsellors such as Janus Bazan, it comes with an understanding of how formative and intense the high school years can be.

“For some adults, it’s a little difficult to imagine that somebody at 15 or 16 can actually love, but it’s so strong. It’s there,” said Bazan.

(Excerpt from Kim Kaschor’s article for CBC News- read more)

Teen Mom Sharing Story To Help Others Overcome Challenges

Tomasa Villaronga looks radiant in her green dress and flowing graduation gown, her hair in perfect curls, her smile quick and wide, her parents and 10-year-old son beaming at her.

TOMASA VILLARONGA recently earned her master’s degree in professional counseling. But since getting pregnant her sophomore year of high school, Villaronga has struggled at times with despair, drinking, loneliness, abusive relationships, medical scares — with a darkness she sometimes felt trapped in, despite the promise she’d made to her unborn son: “I will become the mother you deserve.”