Unhealthy teen relationships may still need room to grow

Janus Bazan is the guidance counsellor department head at Kelvin High School.

 

Emily Bernardin may only be 19 years old, but she knows a thing or two about love, and what it’s like to be in an unhealthy relationship.

“I had some bad experiences, but I’ve grown from them,” said Bernardin, who credits her mother for giving her room to grow.

“My mom knew [about the bad relationship]. We talked about it a lot and she knew she couldn’t make me do anything. She was just there for me through the whole thing, and watched as it fell apart,” said Bernardin.

Guidance counsellors at Kelvin High School watch things fall apart and get put back together on a daily basis. For counsellors such as Janus Bazan, it comes with an understanding of how formative and intense the high school years can be.

“For some adults, it’s a little difficult to imagine that somebody at 15 or 16 can actually love, but it’s so strong. It’s there,” said Bazan.

(Excerpt from Kim Kaschor’s article for CBC News- read more)

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Let’s talk about sex

water drop

As excuse to growing sex issues mainly teenage pregnancies, health officials in the past have laid the blame on the gap between parents and children and their failure to discuss sex education.

Generations have changed hands, the teen some two decades ago is now a parent. The information age via the cyber highway has also changed the way many perceive the issue.

Sex education basics may be covered in health class if the school prefers to teach it. In Fiji, to deal with the issue, the Ministry of Education had introduced a subject called Family Life, it seems that schools have the option to teach it or not.

Excerpt from Shalveen Chand’s article in the Fiji Times– read more