Poll finds gun violence is young people’s greatest fear

WASHINGTON — As the March For Our Lives is set to begin in D.C. Saturday, a new poll finds that gun violence, including in school, is the biggest fear young people face.

USA Today poll of young people ages 13 to 24 found that gun violence came in ahead of terrorism, racism, climate change and paying for college.

“Maybe we shouldn’t be surprised at the way school violence has defined this generation,” USA Today Washington bureau chief Susan Page, who wrote about the poll for the paper, told WTOP Thursday, noting that even the oldest participants in the survey began school after the Columbine High School shootings in 1999. “Throughout their school careers, this has been a reality that they’ve lived with.”

(Excerpt from Rick Massimo’s article in WTOP- read more)


Teen Opinion The perfect li(f)e


We sit in our homes, our charming little castles and look down onto the problems of our community. Most of the time, we choose to look away and ignore the victims on the ground. This is the colossal flaw in our world. We sit in our perfect little homes, with our perfect family, and our perfect life with our heads buried in the sand. We hope, and we pray that something will happen, but never take action. We shut our eyes and close our ears and hope that this situation will blow over. It’s a beautiful lie that everyone’s living.
 The lie that things will magically get better, that world peace will just happen, and bullying will somehow stop.

(Excerpt from teen Lauren Kim’s post in Lamorinda Weekly– read more)

11 Real Reasons Why Teenagers Experiment with Drugs

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There is a common misconception that teenagers who experiment with drugs and alcohol are inherently “bad kids.”

Many parents assume that teenagers experiment because they are rebellious and want to lash out. That may be the reason a small percentage of teenagers try drugs and alcohol today, but the dangerous trend is not that simple or one-sided. In order to understand us, you have to put yourself in our shoes and imagine what we are really experiencing.

Do you remember what it was like to be a teen? Understanding is the first step to helping.

(Excerpt from article in DrugAbuse.com)

Airdrie teen’s love for basketball overcomes all challenges

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A 17-year-old basketball player at an Airdrie high school has had more than his fair share of challenges, but he’s never needed to fight for acceptance among his peers while playing the sport he loves.

Tyson Biever, officially known as the manager of the George McDougall Mustangs, has always been an important part of the squad, teaching everyone on the team about unity, acceptance and awareness.

When he was just three months old, Biever was diagnosed with brain cancer.

(Excerpt from Michael Franklin’s article in TV News Calgary- read more)

Teens take political action

17-year-old Kansas governor candidate Tyler Ruzich speaks at a high school with three other teenage hopefuls for the state's top elected position

With loose khaki pants, a button-down shirt and a dark blue blazer, Tyler Ruzich looks a lot like any number of aspiring politicians before him.

But if the election Ruzich is running in were to be held today, he’d be too young to vote for himself.

The 17-year-old is one of five teens throwing their hats in the crowded ring for next year’s governor’s race in Kansas, which has permissive rules about who can run for the state’s top elected post.

Speaking recently to a crowd of students at a high school gym in the city of Lawrence, Ruzich picked up a microphone and launched into his campaign speech.

“It’s pretty clear that our politicians have neglected us,” Ruzich said, competing to be heard over the clangs of a nearby weightlifting room.

(Excerpt from an article in The Daily Mail. Read more)

Strong Girls:Strong Parents

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Strong Girls, Strong parents: A Guide to Raising Teenage Girls in a New Era
„Your teenage daughter hasn’t lost her mind and neither have you”. So says Strong Girls, Strong Parents: A Guide to Raising Teenage Girls in a New Era, a handbook written by a clinician with more than fifteen years of experience in helping teens and their parents to develop a healthier way of communicating.

Excerpt from Monica Dominirska’s review in Satprn news. Read more.

Cookbook speaks volumes for autistic teen’s many accomplishments

Chase Bailey prepares his "Sweet French Breakfast," featured in his new cookbook. | Jessica Nicosia-Nadler Photo

It’s the endearing smile that first captivates you. It’s followed quickly by an equally engaging and easygoing on-camera presence, smart conversation peppered with plenty of humor, and a professionalism that belies the age of this young YouTube star.

But that’s only scratching the surface of Chase Bailey, a California wunderkind whose been inspiring children and adults for the past two years via his cooking show channel on YouTube, his website and  his latest venture, “The Official Chase ‘N Yur Face Cookbook,” which features 75 original recipes as well as anecdotes and culinary tips/fun facts. (The book is available via Amazon, Barnes & Noble; a portion of the proceeds from the book’s sale will benefit Bailey’s Chase Yur Dreams Foundation.)

(Excerpt from Miriam Di Nunzio’s article in Entertainment- read more)