Trump’s Focus On Teen Abstinence Makes It Harder For LGBTQ People To Learn About Safe Sex

The Department of Health and Human Services issued new funding guidelines for Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program (TPP) grantees on Friday, one day after a federal court ruled that the Trump administration couldn’t cut off funding for those programs. Now, not only will the government shift resources toward abstinence-only programs, but organizations advocating for LGBTQ health say Trump’s focus on teen abstinence completely erases LGBTQ youth. The change could make it much harder for already underrepresented teens to get vital sex education.

(Excerpt from Lauren Holter’s article in Hustle.com– read more)

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Learn how to kick your stress

Learn how to kick your stress

Up until about a year ago, the Santa Fe Prep junior suffered frequent episodes of stress-induced sickness. She is not alone. According to a 2013 study by the American Psychological Association, teens in the United States are even more stressed out than adults.

Not only are teens navigating schoolwork and social pressures, but they’re also growing up “in a world of gun violence and terrorism, social media and lack of good health care in schools,” said Erin Doerwald, a licensed clinical social worker and the Program Director at the SKY Center (New Mexico Suicide Intervention Project). “You guys have been handed a really huge, hard baton. You have to deal with all the age-old troubles of the human condition while also figuring out how to live in a society with a collective ADHD and disconnect from nature, a world that is overscheduled, chronically sleep-deprived, and has essentially forgotten how to slow down.”

(Excerpt from Isabel Gallegos and Hanna Abrams’ article in the Santa Fe New Mexican- read more)

Body dissatisfaction: It’s not just teenage girls

Body dissatisfaction: It’s not just teenage girls

When we think of anxiety about body image, what comes to mind? Adolescent girls standing in front of the mirror wishing they had a thigh gap? Rake-thin young women crippled by anorexia or bulimia? But not teenage boys feeling inadequate because they are not ‘manly’ enough. And certainly not gay and lesbian young people wondering whether they look how they are ‘supposed’ to look.


It is not just teenage girls however.

In 2017, a Youth Select Committee raised concerns about the long-lasting consequences of body dissatisfaction for ‘health, education and wider life outcomes’. Last week, the Government responded to this, releasing a report outlining what should be done to tackle the issue. Significantly, an emphasis has been put on the specific challenges faced by young men, LGBT youth, ethnic minorities and those with disabilities.

(Excerpt from Shannon Rawlins’ article in Shout Out UK– read more)

To get the life that you want, you have to put in the work

To get the life that you want, you have to put in the work

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. — Social anxiety is one of the major challenges for high school and college ladies.

“When I sent out emails asking you about challenges, the No. 1 thing I heard was that you struggle with social anxiety,” said Theresa Rose, who spoke during the ninth annual Women Changing the Face of Agriculture event organized by Illinois Agri-Women.

“This is a really important thing to work through, and do it now as opposed to later,” Rose stressed during her keynote speech. “Because that will keep you from realizing your fullest potential if you aren’t going to show up.”

 

(Excerpt from Martha Blum’s article in Agrinews- read more)

Poll finds gun violence is young people’s greatest fear

WASHINGTON — As the March For Our Lives is set to begin in D.C. Saturday, a new poll finds that gun violence, including in school, is the biggest fear young people face.

USA Today poll of young people ages 13 to 24 found that gun violence came in ahead of terrorism, racism, climate change and paying for college.

“Maybe we shouldn’t be surprised at the way school violence has defined this generation,” USA Today Washington bureau chief Susan Page, who wrote about the poll for the paper, told WTOP Thursday, noting that even the oldest participants in the survey began school after the Columbine High School shootings in 1999. “Throughout their school careers, this has been a reality that they’ve lived with.”

(Excerpt from Rick Massimo’s article in WTOP- read more)

Teen Opinion The perfect li(f)e

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We sit in our homes, our charming little castles and look down onto the problems of our community. Most of the time, we choose to look away and ignore the victims on the ground. This is the colossal flaw in our world. We sit in our perfect little homes, with our perfect family, and our perfect life with our heads buried in the sand. We hope, and we pray that something will happen, but never take action. We shut our eyes and close our ears and hope that this situation will blow over. It’s a beautiful lie that everyone’s living.
 The lie that things will magically get better, that world peace will just happen, and bullying will somehow stop.

(Excerpt from teen Lauren Kim’s post in Lamorinda Weekly– read more)

11 Real Reasons Why Teenagers Experiment with Drugs

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There is a common misconception that teenagers who experiment with drugs and alcohol are inherently “bad kids.”

Many parents assume that teenagers experiment because they are rebellious and want to lash out. That may be the reason a small percentage of teenagers try drugs and alcohol today, but the dangerous trend is not that simple or one-sided. In order to understand us, you have to put yourself in our shoes and imagine what we are really experiencing.

Do you remember what it was like to be a teen? Understanding is the first step to helping.

(Excerpt from article in DrugAbuse.com)