Dating Violence Affects 1 in 3 Teenagers. This Is What You Can Do To Help.

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Trigger warning: This article discusses dating violence and abusive relationships. If you, or someone you know, needs help, visit The National Domestic Violence Hotline and LoveIsrespect for information, resources, and 24/7 live support.

In the United States, one in three adolescents is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional and/or verbal abuse from a romantic partner. That figure not only far exceeds other types of youth violence, according to Cameka Crawford, chief communications officer at The Hotline, but is even higher than the rate of dating violence experienced by adults (one in four women and one in seven men).

By the time women enter college, nearly half (43 percent) have experienced some form of dating abuse. “That’s alarming,” Crawford tells A Plus. “… The time is now to speak up. This is happening far too often in our country.”

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month (TDVAM), with its main event “Respect Week,” taking place on February 12 to 16. The day before Valentine’s Day, February 13, those interested in raising awareness can wear orange in solidarity with survivors of dating violence.

(Excerpt from Lindsay Geller’s article in A Plus- read more)

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5 Things Teens Wish Their Parents Knew

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Working with teens for 20 years, I asked them a simple question, “What do you wish your parents knew more of to improve your life?” Here are their answers. – See more 

Life-changing’ trip inspires teen to help

Elizabeth Tichelman returned last month from a remote area of Fiji, where she volunteered as a teacher for three months.  - Contributed photos

When South Surrey teen Elizabeth Tichelman left the Semiahmoo Peninsula more than three months ago destined for a remote area of Fiji, both she and her mother, Tracy, shared a few tears at the airport.

After all, it was the first time the then-17-year-old had been away from home for any length of time, and she was venturing all alone to the other side of the globe, where she’d be volunteering among strangers at a small primary school.

However, the mild sadness Tichelman felt when she set out on her journey was nothing compared to what she experienced last week on the day she left Koroinasau Primary School, its 87 students and fellow teachers.

Excerpt from Melissa Smalley’s article in the Peace Arch News- read more

More vulnerable teens as stress levels increase

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“Many young people find it difficult to talk about their struggle and to express the pain they are feeling inside,” she said. “They tend to hide their pain behind a facade, not knowing where, how or who they can approach for help. Some may try to cope on their own in ways that can be harmful to themselves.”

Excerpt from an article in Asia OneRead more. 

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How a poem helped save a suicidal teen’s life

There are whole books devoted to demonstrating the power of the written word to soothe pain and heal the tortured mind, the most prominent perhaps “The Novel Cure: An A-Z of Literary Remedies.”And there are studies of the brain showing how the healing happens. There’s even a name for the practice of prescribing literature for its rehabilitative effects: “bibliotherapy.”

(Excerpt from Fred Barbash’s article in the Washington Post.)