Logan Brinson, teen who overcame countless hardships, battles for his life

An undiagnosed chromosome disorder has meant countless surgeries, procedures and doctors. But through all of the hard times, he’s found his own way to blossom into a charismatic young man.

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Together with his mother, Rene Brinson, they’ve overcome countless hardships.

“There’s a balance in life,” Rene Brinson said. “As dark or as low as your lows are, that scale flips and that’s how high your highs are.”

With that balance in mind, the pair have faced every hardship head-on.

Excerpt from Jennifer Schack’s report on WLWT- see more

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‘Malala’ reveals a real-life teen hero

Nobel Prize-winner Malala Yousafzai and Davis Guggenheim talk about peace, and other things, in “He Named Me Malala.” (Courtesy Caroline Furneaux/Twentieth Century Fox)

Filmmaker Davis Guggenheim says he made his Oscar-winning “An Inconvenient Truth” with a certain audience in mind: his Republican cousins living in Ohio.

While making his new documentary “He Named Me Malala,” he was thinking about his own daughters, ages 9 and 14.

“What makes me happy is that my daughters have a real hero — someone they can try to be like, instead of a hero that says you should be more famous or more skinny,” says Guggenheim, who visited The City to promote the movie, which opens Friday.

The film tells the extraordinary story of Malala Yousafzai, a teen Pakistani activist who was shot by the Taliban for daring to suggest that girls should be educated. With the threat of death hanging over her and her family, today she lives in England, where she’s continuing her human rights activism.

She is the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Excerpt from Jefferey Anderson’s article in the San Francisco Examiner– Read more.