ALLEVIATING THE IMPACT OF VIOLENCE AMONG CHILDREN

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For years, research has found violence is learned behavior. The Howard University Violence Prevention Project (HUVPP) suggests children’s exposure to community violence can predict their social and emotional behavior, both in school and at home. In other words, the more elementary school children are exposed to community violence, the more likely they will have adjustment problems.

The research indicates violence is not a random, uncontrollable or inevitable occurrence. Instead, many factors–systemic, social, political and individual—contribute to an individual’s propensity to use violence, and many of these factors can be changed. An American Psychological Association study suggests youngsters who engage in violence tend to share common risk factors that place them on a trajectory towards violence early in life. In addition to actual physical victimization, these factors include witnessing violence at home and in the neighborhood.

Excerpt from Larry Aubrey’s post in Los Angeles Sentinal- read more.

Confronting challenges of teen mental health, stress, suicide

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As in Garrison Keillor’s Lake Wobegon, many parents in the heart of Silicon Valley see their children as all above average, well above average. Those parents’ incomes, educational levels and aspirations for their children are also well above average.

On Monday night, more than 350 people gathered at Sacred Heart Prep in Atherton to hear a panel talk about concerns affecting those above-average children: their mental health, the stress they are under, and what can be done to improve the former, relieve the latter, and ultimately, combat teen suicides.

Excerpt from Barbara Woods’ article in The Almanac– Read more