High School Senior April Ma Explains How “Students Demand Action” Is Working to End Gun Violence

Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams organized a rally

I channeled my anger and frustration into action by founding my local Johnson County, Kansas, chapter of Students Demand Action, a national initiative created by teens and young adults who are ready to join the gun violence prevention movement and demand change. We knew that change wouldn’t come without responsible lawmakers, so we worked quickly to figure out how to make a difference before the midterm elections. Weeks after our founding, we hosted a town hall for the Third Congressional District of Kansas. We also began holding voter registration drives to make sure as many students as possible are registered.

(Excerpt from April Ma’s article in Teen Vogue- Read more)

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Teenager’s incredible maturity while facing her challenges

FAMILY PRIDE: Caitlyn Donohoe, with parents Cammi and Patrick Donohoe, is the regional winner of the Lions Youth of the Year Program .

CAITLYN Donohoe might not be able to lift her hands above her head but it hasn’t stopped her from being crowned a star leader in Biloela.

The 17-year-old, who was born with a rare muscle condition, arthrogryposis, has defied the odds and won regional youth leader of the year after Lions Club judges recognised her impressive portfolio of community engagement.

(Excerpt from Hannah Speghen’s article in The Observer- read more)

Teen aspires to create a community of writers, skateboarders

Press

 

A writer and skateboarder, Homer youth Justice Sky spends his school year studying creative writing and his summers running his skateboard shop.

Majoring in creative writing at Southern Oregon University, he likes to write fiction and poetry.

“For me, writing is about the human experience and is the best way I’ve found to try to figure out how our world works on a very human level,” he said.

(Excerpt for Christina Whiting’s article in the Homer Tribune- read more)

Dating Violence Affects 1 in 3 Teenagers. This Is What You Can Do To Help.

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Trigger warning: This article discusses dating violence and abusive relationships. If you, or someone you know, needs help, visit The National Domestic Violence Hotline and LoveIsrespect for information, resources, and 24/7 live support.

In the United States, one in three adolescents is a victim of physical, sexual, emotional and/or verbal abuse from a romantic partner. That figure not only far exceeds other types of youth violence, according to Cameka Crawford, chief communications officer at The Hotline, but is even higher than the rate of dating violence experienced by adults (one in four women and one in seven men).

By the time women enter college, nearly half (43 percent) have experienced some form of dating abuse. “That’s alarming,” Crawford tells A Plus. “… The time is now to speak up. This is happening far too often in our country.”

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month (TDVAM), with its main event “Respect Week,” taking place on February 12 to 16. The day before Valentine’s Day, February 13, those interested in raising awareness can wear orange in solidarity with survivors of dating violence.

(Excerpt from Lindsay Geller’s article in A Plus- read more)

How to talk about teen mental health

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Mental health conditions can emerge in adolescence or early adulthood, so it’s important to talk about it as soon as possible. But it’s critically important that the conversations occur at a young age, particularly because mental health conditions often emerge during adolescence or early adulthood. One in five teenagers ages 13 through 18 are living with a mental health illness, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

Teens take political action

17-year-old Kansas governor candidate Tyler Ruzich speaks at a high school with three other teenage hopefuls for the state's top elected position

With loose khaki pants, a button-down shirt and a dark blue blazer, Tyler Ruzich looks a lot like any number of aspiring politicians before him.

But if the election Ruzich is running in were to be held today, he’d be too young to vote for himself.

The 17-year-old is one of five teens throwing their hats in the crowded ring for next year’s governor’s race in Kansas, which has permissive rules about who can run for the state’s top elected post.

Speaking recently to a crowd of students at a high school gym in the city of Lawrence, Ruzich picked up a microphone and launched into his campaign speech.

“It’s pretty clear that our politicians have neglected us,” Ruzich said, competing to be heard over the clangs of a nearby weightlifting room.

(Excerpt from an article in The Daily Mail. Read more)