Stress is making America sick | Plazas

A photo by Rosalind Chang. unsplash.com/photos/qtIsUwoP94s

The worries that young people confess to clinical psychologist Amy Mariaskin have changed drastically over time.

Just a few years ago, they stressed about stereotypical pre-teen and teenage problems, such as how to fit in.

Today, they fear they will die in a mass shooting.

“I’ve seen a shift from the sources of anxiety,” said Mariaskin, director of the Nashville OCD and Anxiety Treatment Center. “It went from, ‘Does this person like me?’ or ‘Am I going to be successful?’ to ‘What’s going to happen to my country?’ and ‘Am I going to be targeted?’” (Excerpt from an article by David Plazas in the Nashville Teneseean- read more)

 

 

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What it means to be masculine

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Harry Styles and Timothée Chalamet Talked Masculinity in New Interview

Both men had a lot to say about their own personal philosophies, and what they’re trying to achieve with the public projects they take part in, as well as what masculinity means to them. In the interview, Styles specifically asked Chalamet if, in the context of “where the world’s at today,” he feels a “responsibility as an actor to represent a new form of masculinity on screen,” especially considering that “the concept of masculinity has changed so much since we were growing up.”

 

Why is it so hard for teens to say no to drugs and alcohol?

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A psychologist outlines the characteristics that make a teen more vulnerable to poor choices.

Drug abuse is a serious social problem in the world today because of the impact it can have on the health and well-being of society. Adolescents are one of the demographic groups most vulnerable to this danger.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has highlighted the importance of knowing and understanding why this group is more inclined to drug use, as well as the serious risks it involves, so strategies can be devised to help prevent and respond to the problem.

Excerpt from Javier Perez’s article in Aleteia- read more

‘I really feel I mucked it up’: When dads and daughters disconnect

“I can’t think of an example in popular media of a really good father-daughter relationship,” says clinical psychologist Andrew Fuller.

The bond between fathers and their daughters has long been recognised as special. That is, until she hits puberty – at which point it often fractures, sometimes irreparably.

Excerpt from Madonna King’s article in The Sydney Morning Herald (read more)

The Soul of America and the Souls of Its Residents

 

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If once you forfeit the confidence of your fellow-citizens, you can never regain their respect and esteem.

 ~Abraham Lincoln~

Not too long ago, I reviewed John Meachum’s book, The Soul of America. I noted that the soul of which he speaks is a patchwork of all of those who inhabit America and as such is a messy concept to describe and make sense of. Our collective soul is a fabric woven from our individual souls. But what does this mean?

Each of us has a stake in the meaning and makeup of our country. We do have some things in common. I would dare say the majority of us agree that we would like to have the basics to build a satisfying life for ourselves. We would also like to have adequate housing, enough food to eat, good health and the opportunity for our children to make their own way in the world.

Some of us are born with a head start. Support from our parents and relatives, family financial resources and a neighborhood in which we can feel safe give us confidence that we can set and meet goals for our lives. Others in this country barely have a toehold. They may have arrived as refugees from oppressive countries by the skin of their teeth. They may not understand or speak English. They may have valuable skills but not appropriate credentials by which their skills can be recognized or documented.

Some of us had a relatively peaceful upbringing and entered adulthood confident of our ability to make our own way in the world. Others of us have been marginalized and made to feel inferior in comparison with our fellow citizens. We do not all emerge from our childhood and adolescence with the same perspective on the world, our country or ourselves. All of the things I have mentioned go into the makeup of our individual souls.

In my opinion, your soul consists of one’s past experiences and how they have affected your sense of who you are, your feeling of self-worth and outlook on the prospects for a fulfilling life. In addition to thoughts about yourself you also carry feelings which result from these experiences. You might emerge from your upbringing as happy, optimistic and self confident. With different experiences, you might emerge as unhappy, pessimistic and unsure of yourself.

The soul of America is a mixture of all of our individual souls. With our different backgrounds and experiences, it can be very difficult for us to understand and support each other. That is the challenge we face. It may be difficult but that does not make it impossible. Just try to remember that not everyone has had the same experiences you have and may view their life very differently from how you view yours.

Action Steps

  • Take time to understand what lies in your soul.
  • What do you like about what you find and what could you change?
  • When meeting strangers, try to understand what lies in their souls.
  • Think what it would be like to have their history.
  • Try to understand your differences.

The fear, the fight, the future: The threat of gun violence is a new reality for today’s students

On March 14, exactly one month after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, thousands of students at area schools walked out of their classrooms to honor the 17 students and faculty who lost their lives on Valentine’s Day in Florida, also demanding stronger gun control across the nation. Photo by Eze Amos

The lights were off and the door was locked in Shreya Mahadevan’s fourth-grade classroom at Johnson Elementary School. Small bodies huddled quietly behind a wall of backpacks—their teacher in tears.

“It was really scary. Petrifying,” says the 9-year-old girl about the lockdown her school was under last October, when a man in nearby Johnson Village was on the run after a reported burglary and sexual assault.

But as she huddled near the backpacks, and then ducked behind a bookshelf for cover, she didn’t know why—she just knew it felt different than the drills she’d been practicing.

“It’s not scary if we’re having a drill,” says Shreya. “It just makes you feel like you know what to do when something happens.”

Pausing for a moment, she corrects herself: “If something happens.”

(Excerpt from Samantha Baars’ article in C-Ville- read more)

High School Senior April Ma Explains How “Students Demand Action” Is Working to End Gun Violence

Brooklyn Borough President Eric L. Adams organized a rally

I channeled my anger and frustration into action by founding my local Johnson County, Kansas, chapter of Students Demand Action, a national initiative created by teens and young adults who are ready to join the gun violence prevention movement and demand change. We knew that change wouldn’t come without responsible lawmakers, so we worked quickly to figure out how to make a difference before the midterm elections. Weeks after our founding, we hosted a town hall for the Third Congressional District of Kansas. We also began holding voter registration drives to make sure as many students as possible are registered.

(Excerpt from April Ma’s article in Teen Vogue- Read more)