Meet 10 budding tech stars who aren’t even 20 years old

When Raquel Hosein was 16 years old, she fell down a flight of stairs and hit her head. The injury led to chronic seizures. Many, if not most, teenagers might find the newfound ailment to be debilitating. But not Hosein.

At 18, she developed a breakthrough technology that could detect seizures before they happen. She constructed a hat lined with electrodes that nestle in an individual’s hair and scalp. The electrodes are part of a mobile EEG system that measures brain activity, which connects to a smartphone app that can message a user when they need to take medication and prepare for a seizure.

(Excerpt from Claire Grodin’s article in Fortune- Read more)

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New York Teen Invents Real-Life Closed Captioning

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It’s one of those things you can’t believe Google Glass didn’t think of with its built in mic and camera, but when Manhattan’s Daniil Frants investigated he found that the wearable didn’t have the best setup for deaf people. So the 16-year-old took it upon himself to invent the Live-Time Closed Captioning System, a device that lets deaf people see conversations closed-captioned as they happen.

(Excerpt from Peter Rugg’s article in Inverse- Read More)

Transgender Teen Becomes Role Model On ‘I Am Jazz’

"I Am Jazz" tells the story of a transgender teen.

Jazz Jennings has become a reality TV breakout star and a transgender role model — and she’s only 14-years-old. The teenager featured on the TLC show I Am Jazz is bravely and boldly sharing an inside look at what life is like as a transgender teen, from the challenges to the triumphs to the heartbreaks, reported People.

 And while Jazz’s show reveals the medical and physical specifics of what is involved in transitioning from a girl to a boy at a young age, I Am Jazz also shows the emotional impact. Supported by family and carefully chosen friends, Jazz is comfortable hanging out with her female pals. But the idea of getting involved with boys her age presents challenges not faced by her girlfriends.

(Excerpt from an article in Inquisitr.com. Read more)

What do you like best about yourself?

sun behind cloud

Teens like a wide variety of things about themselves. Being able to entertain friends or having a nice personality come to mind for several of the teens I talked with. If you are fun to be around, you will be popular and never lacking for company. Did you ever wonder what makes you attractive to others? It’s not so much what you look like. Being very pretty or handsome might even make others jealous.

A researcher in the nineteen sixties studied what people look for in a friend. The number one quality is being able to listen. If you can keep your mouth shut when you need to, hear what someone is saying, and understand how that person feels, you will be very much in demand. As Amy puts it, “I have the ability to put myself in others’ shoes.”

Some see their sense of themselves as their best quality. Ellie says, “I know who I am and stick with my values.” This is not always easy to do. You have to think about what’s important to you and decide that what you believe in is more important than making others happy.

Did you know it’s impossible to keep everyone happy? No matter what you do, there will be some people who like what you do and others who don’t. If you follow your own sense of values, you will attract friends who respect what you believe in. You probably wouldn’t enjoy the company of others who don’t share your values anyway.

Can you imagine having a friend who changes his or her mind all the time? Maybe you have a friend like this. You never know what to expect and probably wouldn’t be able to count on that person for anything important. Being consistent in your values makes it easier for you to decide what to do when something really important happens. It also helps your friends know what to expect from you. Consistency is probably the most important quality of a good friend after being a good listener.

Other teens like their physical qualities such as their appearance or sports ability. As with personality, these might be just as much a reason for others to be jealous as to like you. However, what is important is that your physical appearance or sports ability might give you some confidence which you might not otherwise have. Your self confidence just might attract others more than your special abilities or appearance.

(Excerpt from Make the Best of Your Teen Years: 105 Ways to Do it.)

Release Your Stress and Recaim Your Life

Joe Langen’s Release Your Stress and Reclaim Your Life is an outstanding work. Interestingly the author begins by asking – Do we living in modern America suffer more from stress than our ancestors did?
While I, of course, can’t answer that question within the broad scope of history, I can confidently say that during my lifetime the types of stress that come from concerns like: finding and keeping a satisfying, well- paying secure, long term job; facing large medical bills without filing for bankruptcy; and paying for our children’s college expenses and maintain the hope of enjoying a financially comfortable retirement, has certainly increased dramatically (except among those fortunate enough to be among the wealthiest .01 % in our economy) over the last two generations.
For such reasons this book is imperative reading for the countless millions who frantically try to weave their way through the cultural maze that constitutes life in America today.
The book is clearly written, understandable, comprehensive, and composed by an expert in many aspect of stress – Issues such as: What is stress? How can we identify it in ourselves?, and How can we effectively avoid, manage and/or attack our own stress?
For me, the chapter on spirituality was especially helpful. I almost skipped it because I don’t consider myself spiritual. I never could, for example, grasp the idea of a soul – one that exists in the after- life. (I can’t say souls don’t exist. Maybe they do, but if so I have no idea, what they are like.) But now I’m glad I read that chapter because, if, as suggested by the author, one’s soul is the part of you that acknowledges, you are not the center of the universe, and are instead, an integral part of the human race, and as such you have a duty to act responsibly to assist your fellow man, to achieve the highest common good, then I must be spiritual, because, that responsibility, in my opinion, defines the essence of humanity.

(Review by Bob Fussell)

Read more about this book, give it a test drive or order it at Amazon

Only- a poem for teens

kayak

Only

A poem by Violet

I have never loved
only wanted
to wrap myself in other skin,
hide my eyes behind another face.

I have only wanted
a better soul than mine,
a graceful body, a strength,
and certainly this flesh could never have.

I have longed
for a patchwork, an alloy
of the pure, intelligent, the solid
a melting pot of my unobtainable traits.

I have watched,
as if I could adapt my observation,
the movements of perfection
that I wished were mine.

I have envied
affectionately from a distance
I can’t imagine coming any closer.

*****

Violet writes about longing for “a patchwork, an alloy of the pure, intelligent, the solid a melting pot of my unobtainable traits.” She is trying to figure out how all the things she knows about herself can come together in a way that makes sense to her. We are all creatures of contradictions. We have rough edges and have parts of us we wish were different.

(Excerpt from Make the Best of Your Teen Years.)

The Reality of Teen Peer Pressure

Right now it is 1:30 in the morning, and I just really can’t sleep because of stuff I’ve got on my mind.

So here we go.

From first to eighth grade, we had a “Guidance” period, which was an extra period we had in place of one of our extra curricular periods every week. The teacher taught us about peer pressure for alcohol and drugs. We had D.A.R.E. which was the same thing but mainly for drugs.

(Excerpt from the blog The Reality of Teen Peer Pressure ‹ Reader — WordPress.com.)