Screen time might boost depression, suicide behaviors in teens

A new study finds that teens, especially girls, who spend several hours per day on phones and tablets are more likely to be depressed and have suicide-related outcomes.

(Excerpt from Science Daily report. Read more)

In our opinion: Operation Safety Net to take on suicide risk among LGBT youth

 

Climber belaying fellow climber

State health officials recently reported an alarming increase in rates of suicide among teenagers in Utah, to the point that it is now the leading cause of death among children 10 to 17. The exact reasons for the increase are not entirely clear, but there is a great deal of informed speculation taking place about what is clearly a community problem of tragic proportions. We are seeing a growing level of public awareness as well as a willingness to discuss the issue openly and candidly and move toward finding solutions.

This is healthy and positive, particularly in the category of suicide rates among lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth. Statistics would indicate that LGBT teens are four times more likely to engage in suicidal behavior, and potentially less likely to seek help. Various organizations are working to better understand the problem and identify ways to take action, including a new program called Operation Safety Net, which deserves credit for furthering a community dialogue about an issue that is highly sensitive and often difficult to speak of in policy circles, as well as in family settings. Read more

Confronting challenges of teen mental health, stress, suicide

teens on path

As in Garrison Keillor’s Lake Wobegon, many parents in the heart of Silicon Valley see their children as all above average, well above average. Those parents’ incomes, educational levels and aspirations for their children are also well above average.

On Monday night, more than 350 people gathered at Sacred Heart Prep in Atherton to hear a panel talk about concerns affecting those above-average children: their mental health, the stress they are under, and what can be done to improve the former, relieve the latter, and ultimately, combat teen suicides.

Excerpt from Barbara Woods’ article in The Almanac– Read more

How a poem helped save a suicidal teen’s life

There are whole books devoted to demonstrating the power of the written word to soothe pain and heal the tortured mind, the most prominent perhaps “The Novel Cure: An A-Z of Literary Remedies.”And there are studies of the brain showing how the healing happens. There’s even a name for the practice of prescribing literature for its rehabilitative effects: “bibliotherapy.”

(Excerpt from Fred Barbash’s article in the Washington Post.)